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Posts tagged ‘clouds’

Roots of my vision…

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As a photographer, it’s vital to have a vision, and to always keep your mind and heart tuned in and focused on that vision. There’s so much noise in the world, so many things that distract us, stress us, and compete for space in our consciousness. For me, a photographer’s vision is like a true arrow, pointing toward what is meaningful and honest about what I do. Earlier this week, while I was in the midst of the buzz of activities that consumes my life, I was struck by the stark, drama of the landscape outside my window. I stopped what I was doing, collected my gear, and stepped outside. It brought me back to what I love, what moves me. I never want to lose those roots, because they keep me centered, grounded and give meaning to what I do. Hope you enjoy…

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Moonrise morning…

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A pleasant surprise greeted me this morning at daybreak, as I walked out to pickup the morning papers and scrape the dusting of frost off the car…. this is why I keep a loaded camera ready! Moments later, this lovely moonrise was a ghost. Hope you enjoy…

Being and Nothingness…

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Some people might look at this image and think, “There’s nothing there.” Others might look at it and think, “The whole world is there.” Photography has infinite shades and nuances, which is part of the everlasting appeal of the art to me. I shot this image a few days ago, on one of those, forgive the trite phrase, “picture perfect” new autumn afternoons–when the world was bright and aglow with the crispness of early fall, and the sky was a sketchbook of possibilities. Coming home from a work meeting… my eyes couldn’t take themselves from the sky, where it seemed that every manner of cloud formation–cumulus, cirrus, stratus, nimbus–had come together in a magnificent display, each formation as fleeting as time itself. Yes, I suppose you could say this is only a picture of the sky. But to me, the whole world is there. Hope you enjoy…

Up, up, and away…

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When you are out on a photography assignment, it’s easy to become focused on the business at hand. But when you have a camera around your neck, the world is your oyster. This shot is an example of why it’s important to look up and around, and not just through the lens. I was out shooting a soccer practice at the fields close to our home, when I saw this blimp go bobbing by. It came closer, and closer and at first I didn’t react, but the more it sat there, in my field of view, I figured I’d see if I could take more than simply a grab-and-go shot. As it turned on its end to make a loop in the sky, I took my shot. In the end, I really liked the way it’s isolated with the dramatic clouds underneath, a small alien in a sea of atmosphere. Hope you enjoy…

 

Big sky country…

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There is nothing more dramatic, more magical, than a winter sky. It’s truly the season of the “big sky” and if you are photographer and you don’t get out and shoot from December to February, you are truly missing one of nature’s most wondrous achievements. The problem for me in the winter is that am generally working til dark, and I usually glance up and out my window right about the time the “big show” begins… only to realize that by the time I grab a camera, fit a lens, jump in the car, and stash my tripod, the magic will have passed. There is more leeway to make this all come together after work in the summer, but unfortunately, the skies just don’t seem to have the same magnificence in July. This image was taken a couple of evenings ago at a park just across the street from where I live. I was prepared to come away with nothing, or next to nothing, but I forced myself to go through the motions and see if I’d get lucky, somehow. While the spot I was shooting from was far from ideal–no sweeping vistas here–once I saw what was happening in the cosmos, I just sat down and shot. I tried about a dozen different angles and hoped for the best. In the end, I think I captured a bit of the majesty I enjoyed in person, which in truth, is always my personal photographic objective. So while the sun may be warmer in June, I’ll always be able to look back and appreciate this gorgeous mid-winter sunset. Hope you enjoy…

Winter’s WOW factor…

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Autumn seems to be all about color. Once those green tones of summer begin to evolve into shades of orange, red, rust, and yellow, photographers (me included) leap to our feet, run about madly and try to soak up the color like a sponge–often shooting hue, instead of true composition. You can’t help it, and I am as guilty as the rest. But then December kicks in, and those remaining leaves are dull brown, the skies often turn blustery or gray, and we are left wondering where it all went.

Luckily, the onset of winter brings another dazzling subject–those dusky winter skies. I am no meteorologist, but I assume the tilt of the earth’s axis as we enter the winter solstice gives the sun’s rays that searing ability to blaze through the clouds and offer some of the most gorgeous, breathtaking sunsets of the year. No matter what the scientific reason, I am literally gasping for breath every time a scene like the one above explodes on the landscape, making even an ordinary setting like my backyard look like a scene-stealing broadway star. Now, that’s WOW factor! Hope you enjoy…

Just turn around…

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I’ve always been attracted to trees… their sturdiness, longevity, and life-giving force are the very embodiment of nature’s inherent strength over adversity. They are, of course, simply beautiful as well. I have always been drawn to trees–as a child they seemed to hold some sort of magic in the majesty of their branches, arching to touch the sky, crocheting a pattern of profoundly complex branches and leaves that to this day, can hold me in rapt attention. So it’s no surprise that I photograph trees, especially in the fall and winter, when their stark appearance seems to beg center stage. Funny enough, for the image above, I had set out to photograph clouds. I saw them forming late one afternoon and, in a race against time, grabbed my camera, tripod, and took off for what I knew would end up yielding me all of 10 minutes of prime capture time, given the lateness of the hour. No matter–I set out on a mission. And while I did indeed shoot several interesting shots of the gathering clouds facing the east, it was when I had packed up and turned around the other way, to the west, that I saw the tree. Beautifully silhouetted against those gorgeous purple and gold clouds, there it stood, and I knew I had found what I came for. It’s magic when that happens. Hope you enjoy…